October 12, 2010

HOW JOURNALISTS CHEAT TO MAKE THEMSELVES LOOK BETTER

Now, if this looks like I have a personal vendetta against Deadline Hollywood, listen up, it is not personal. It's just that this site exposes some of the worst behavioural patterns that can be found in any journalistic venture today, only that it is for a relatively small group of people.

So here's one of their scoops, written by their most awesome television reporting personalities, Nellie Andreva. Watch it closely. It was written on Monday. And got picked up and cut-and-pasted to thing like Google Groups (this time I did not make a screenshot, because I didn't think it was that important).
TNT has handed a pilot order to Hollywood & Vine, a noir mystery drama from writer Daniel Pyne (Any Given Sunday). Produced by Warner Horizon, Hollywood & Vine takes place in post-WWII Los Angeles, a setting made famous by novelist Raymond Chandler. It centers on a savvy private eye with a stoic charm and an uncompromising set of personal values who is dedicated to searching for the truth – even if it means taking on the upper echelons of power in a city balanced precariously between the glamour of Hollywood and Beverly Hills and the dual threat of organized crime and a corrupt police department. Hollywood & Vine, originally featured on TNT's 2009 development slate, joins 3 other pilots recently ordered by TNT: Dallas, Perception and an untitled project from Allan Loeb. Period series have been on the rise fueled by the popularity of the 1960s ad agency drama Mad Men on AMC. HBO recently rolled out its prohibition era extravaganza Boardwalk Empire; Showtime is prepping The Borgias, a series set during the Italian Renaissance; AMC ordered pilot Hell on Wheels set during the building of the Union Pacific Railroad in the 1860s; while ABC is developing an Pan Am-themed drama set in the 1960s.
You may go, why did he highlight that particular sentence in blod orange, and why should I care? Well, you don't have to care, like I said, it is a minimal thing, but it is also factually wrong. Raymond Chandler never stood for a post-WWII Los Angeles, and this is easy to find out, because The Big Sleep was published in 1939, and there were Phillip Marlowe short stories before that date. Noir as a literary genre (for lack of a better word) predates World War II by a good couple of years and was part of the pulp fiction boom in the 1920s and 1930s. So, yeah, didn't know WWII happened so early. So, last night, upon reading this, I shot off a comment that set the record clear (always set the facts straight, right?). So, please, don't anybody tell me that there wasn't a comment, how could I know there was a comment, blah blah blah. I know it, because it was me.

Of course, this morning, that comment didn't appear, nor was there an update clearly marked that stated something like In an earlier version, Raymond Chandler was slightly misplaced time-wise.

Instead, you got this.
TNT has handed a pilot order to Hollywood & Vine, a noir mystery drama from writer Daniel Pyne (Any Given Sunday). Produced by Warner Horizon, Hollywood & Vine takes place in post-WWII Los Angeles. [ooops] It centers on a savvy private eye with a stoic charm and an uncompromising set of personal values who is dedicated to searching for the truth – even if it means taking on the upper echelons of power in a city balanced precariously between the glamour of Hollywood and Beverly Hills and the dual threat of organized crime and a corrupt police department. Hollywood  & Vine, originally featured on TNT's 2009 development slate, joins 3 other pilots recently ordered by TNT: Dallas, Perception and an untitled project from Allan Loeb. Period series have been on the rise fueled by the popularity of the 1960s ad agency drama Mad Men on AMC. HBO recently rolled out its prohibition era extravaganza Boardwalk Empire; Showtime is prepping The Borgias, a series set during the Italian Renaissance; AMC ordered pilot Hell on Wheels set during the building of the Union Pacific Railroad in the 1860s; while ABC is developing an Pan Am-themed drama set in the 1960s.
Like I said, shouldn't be a big thing, shouldn't bother me, but it does.

Because as I have pointed out so many times before, it is not the fact that journalists make mistakes, we all do, we are all but human, but to then let the comment fall under the table that pointed out the mistake? Very bad behaviour. To then change the story and make it look like it had been always written this way?

Inexcusable.

Whoa, Nellie. You know what that does? It doesn't make you look smarter, it just makes you look like an asshole who cannot admit they got something wrong. And this is coming from an arrogant asshole who can admit when he got something wrong.

Honey, didn't you learn anything from Mark Zuckerberg and his IM chats?

The internet is forever.